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Full text of "Bloomsburg State College undergraduate bulletin supplement. Undergraduate Catalog Supplement 1977-1978"

Bloomsburg State College 

Undergraduate Bulletin 

Supplement 



1977-1978 



BLOOMS BURG STATE COLLEGE 

UNDERGRADUATE BULLETIN 

SUPPLEMENT 




1977 -1978 
Undergraduate Catalog Supplement 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/blooms77bloo 



BLOOMSBURG STATE COLLEGE 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

for 

1978-79 

1978 Summer Sessions: May 30 — August 18 
MWF: 44 Class Hours- TTH: 45 Class Hours MWF: 45 Class Hours- TTH: 45 Class Hours 



SEMESTER I (1978) 



SEMESTER II (1979) 



Registration 
Classes Begin 
No Classes 



Monday, August 28 

Tuesday, August 29, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, September 4 (Labor Day) 



Thanksgiving Recess Begins End of Classes on Wednesday, 

November 22 



Classes Resume 
Classes End 

Reading Day 



Monday, November 27, 8:00 a.m. 

End of Classes on Wednesday, 
December 13 

Thursday, December 14 



Final Exam. Period Begins Friday, December 15, 8:00 a.m. 

(includes Sat., December 16) 



First Semester Ends 
Commencement 



Thursday, December 21 
Sunday, December 17 



Registration 
Classes Begin 
Spring Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Easter Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 

Classes End 

Reading Days 

Final Exam. Period Begins 

Second Semester Ends 

Commencement 



Tuesday, January 16 

Wednesday, January 17 

End of Classes on Friday, 
February 23 

Monday, March 5, 8:00 a.m. 

End of Classes on Wednesday, 
April 11 

Tuesday, April 17, 8:00 a.m. 

End of classes on Friday, May 11 

Saturday, Sunday, May 12-13 

Monday, May 14 

Saturday, May 19 

Sunday, May 20 



1979 Summer Sessions— May 28 through August 17 



BLOOMSBURG STATE COLLEGE 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

for 

1979-80 



MWF: 44 Class Hours - TTH: 45 Class Hours 



MWF: 45 Class Hours - TTH: 45 Class Hours 



SEMESTER I (1979) 



SEMESTER II (1980) 



Registration 

Classes Begin 

No Classes 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Classes End 

Reading Day 

Final Exam. Period Begins 

First Semester Ends 
Commencement 



Monday, August 27 

Tuesday, August 28 

Monday, September 3 (Labor Day) 

End of Classes on Wednesday, 
November 21 

Monday, November 26, 8:00 a.m. 

End of Classes on Wednesday, 
December 12 

Thursday, December 13 

Friday, December 14, 8:00 a.m. 
(and includes Sat., Dec. 15) 

Thursday, December 20 

Sunday, December 16 



Registration 
Classes Begin 
Spring Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Easter Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Classes End 

Final Exam. Period Begins 
Second Semester Ends 
Commencement 



Tuesday, January 15 

Wednesday, January 16 

End of Classes on Friday, 
February 22 

Monday, March 3, 8:00 a.m. 

End of Classes on Wednesday, 
April 2 

Tuesday, April 8, 8:00 a.m. 

End of Classes on Friday, 
May 9 

Monday, May 1 2 

Saturday, May 17 

Sunday, May 18 



1980 Summer Sessions — May 25 through August 15 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



35 & 36 



Residence Halls 
Dining Rooms, 
College Union 
section revised. 



BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES 

Lycoming Hall, the newest edition to our residence hall 
community, officially opened during the fall of 1976. In addi- 
tion to housing 250 women, the building offers lounges, study 
rooms, recreation areas, special project facilities, and an apart- 
ment for the resident dean. 

Columbia Hall, completed in 1970, is a nine-story resi- 
dence hall for 400 women. It contains lounges, recreation areas, 
study rooms, a special projects room, and apartments for resi- 
dent staff members. 

Elwell Hall, completed in 1968, is a nine-story residence 
hall which can accommodate 678 students. It features recre- 
ation rooms and lounges, study rooms, and apartments for staff. 
Its name honors Judge William Elwell, a former trustee of the 
College, George F. Elwell, his son, a graduate and former trus- 
tee, and G. Edward Elwell, his grandson, a graduate and former 
instructor in French. 

Luzerne Hall, a four-story residence hall completed in 
1967, accommodates 300 students. It includes lounge and recre- 
ation facilities, study rooms, and staff apartments. 

Montour Hall and Schuylkill Hall, four-story residences 
completed in 1964, share the distinction of being the campus' 
only coeducational facilities, each hall housing 250 men and 
women. Each hall is divided into two wings, complete with re- 
creation and lounge facilities, study rooms, and apartments for 
resident staff members. 

1 



Northumberland Hall, completed in 1960, accommodates 
200 residents. There are lounge and recreation areas, study 
rooms, and apartments for staff members. (Lycoming, Luzerne, 
Columbia, Montour, Schuylkill and Northumberland are names 
of counties from which many students come to Bloomsburg.) 

The alignment of halls according to coed and single sexed 
is subject to revision based upon male/female enrollment figures 
and current student needs. 

William W. Scranton Commons, completed in 1970, is an 
air-conditioned dining facility with one thousand seats and with 
a capacity to serve 2900 students at each meal. Folding parti- 
tions permit flexibility of arrangement. A faculty dining room 
and two lounges are in the building. William W. Scranton was 
Governor of Pennsylvania from 1963 to 1967. 

College Store. This building was completed in 1956 and 
used until 1970 as the college Commons and from 1970 until 
1973 as a temporary Union. The building has been remodeled 
and is now used as the College Store for the sale of textbooks 
and supplies. 
Page 36 Kehr Union Marguerite W. Kehr College Union. The Kehr Union Build- 

ing houses a commercial branch bank, a formal lounge, a snack 
bar and dining area, a multi-purpose room, a mail room and 
mailboxes for commuting students, a game room, television 
room, listening room, offices for student organizations and pub- 
lications, the college infirmiry, an information center, bowling 
alleys, a travel service, the Community Activities office, and 
storage area. Its name honors the late Dr. Marguerite W. Kehr, 
who was Dean of Women at the College, 1928 to 1953. 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 37 



BLOOMSBURG 
FOUNDATION, 
INC. 



The Bloomsburg Foundation was established in 1970 as a 
non-profit educational corporation to assist the College in func- 
tions for which state funds should not or cannot be used. The 
Foundation may solicit, receive and manage gifts and grants 
from individuals, corporations, or other foundations; its funds 
are used to assist the College in carrying out its educational 
mission. 



Page 39 



Housing Fees 
Revised 



Residence Halls 

Room and meals in a campus residence hall cost $500 per 
semester, $198 for a six-week summer session, and $99 for a 
three-week summer session. 

The Fall Semester fee is payable before August 15; it may 
be paid in two installments, $250 before August 15 and $250 
before November. 



Page 40 



Page 41 



Meals for Off- 
Campus Resi- 
dents — Cost 
Revised 

Basic Fees 



Students who live off campus may take their meals in the 
dining hall if space is available. The rate for 15 meals per week 
is $206.50 per semester, and for the 20 meals per week is 
$220.00 per semester. 

Fees for tuition are eligible for refunds when the student 
withdraws from college. All refund requests must be submitted 
in writing to the Business Office, Waller Administration Build- 
ing. A student is eligible for consideration for a refund for any 
reason approved by the President or the President's designated 
official, or illness certified by a physician. The refund schedule 

3 



Page 41 



Community 
Activities Fee 
Policy 
Revised 



will apply also to all part-time students. Except for forfeit of 
advanced deposits, listed above, refunds for basic fees will be 
based on the following schedule applicable after the first full 
class day: 



1st through 


3rd week 


4th week 


5th week 


after 5th 


2nd week 








week 


80% 


70% 


60% 


50% 


No Refund 



Refund schedule for the summer sessions is published in the 
Summer Session catalogue. 

Freshmen or other new incoming students may apply for a 
full refund ($60.00) if written application is received by the 
Student Life Accountant, Community Activities Office, prior 
to the beginning of the Fall Semester and if one of the following 
circumstances pertains: withdrawal by the College of the offer 
of admission; induction into the Armed Forces; illness certified 
by a physician as preventing enrollment. A partial refund 
($30.00) is granted if written application is received prior to 
August 1 for the Fall semester and if reasons other than those 
specified above determine the student's decision not to enroll. 

A refund of $30.00 may be granted if written application 
is received by the Student Life Accountant, Community Activ- 
ities Office prior to registration for the Spring semester and if 
one of the following circumstances pertains: withdrawal by the 
College of the offer of admission; induction into the Armed 
Forces; illness certified by a physician as preventing enrollment. 
If reasons other than those specified above determine the stu- 
dent's decision not to enroll, then a refund will not be granted 
for the Spring semester. 



NOTE: Freshmen or other new incoming students include 
but are not limited to: first semester freshmen, transfer stu- 
dents, readmits, non-degree or continuing education students 
enrolling as fulltime undergraduate degree students, and summer 
freshmen, etc. 

A student who has completed at least one semester as a 
fulltime degree student at the College and who after making 
advance payment of his Community Activities Fee for a year 
decides not to return is entitled to a full refund if that student's 
written request is received by the Student Life Accountant, 
Community Activities Office, prior to registration of the Fall 
semester; the student is entitled to a full refund for the second 
semester if the written request is received prior to registration 
for the Spring Semester. 

If a student voluntarily withdraws during the first half of 
the Fall semester, half of the Fall semester fee and the entire 
Spring semester fee may be refunded. If the student withdraws 
during the first half of the Spring semester, a refund of half of 
the Spring semester fee may be made. In either case, written ap- 
plication for a refund must be received by the Student Life 
Accountant before the end of the semester during which the 
withdrawal occurs. 

A student who has been suspended will not be given a re- 
fund for the semester involved. All written applications must be 
received in the Community Activities Office prior to the begin- 
ning of the semester following suspension. 

All requests for refunds of Summer Community Activities 
fees must be in writing and received in the Community Activi- 
ties Office within a five day period immediately following the 
summer session registration in question. 

5 



Page 43 



Student 
Financial Aid 
Revised 



Student Financial Aid 

All financial aid programs are regulated by the Department 
of Health, Education, and Welfare; PA Higher Education Assis- 
tance Agency; and Bloomsburg State College policy. According- 
ly, it is important to understand that a student may lose finan- 
cial aid by failing to maintain good academic standing each 
semester as prescribed in the Bloomsburg State College Bulletin 
under Section 5.05, Page 69. 

Financial aid available includes loans, part-time employ- 
ment, scholarships and grants. The Federal and Commonwealth 
governments fund most of the programs. 

Federal programs include College Work-Study, National 
Direct Student Loans, the Supplemental Educational Opportun- 
ity Grants, and the Basic Educational Opportunity Grants. 

Commonwealth programs include the Pennsylvania State 
Student Employment, the State Guaranty Loans (with Federal 
subsidy on interest payment for certain income levels), and the 
Pennsylvania State Grant Program. 

The State Guaranty Loans and the State Grants are admin- 
istered by the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA). Information may be obtained from counsellors in 
high schools or from PHEAA regional representatives. To be 
eligible for payment for summer school attendance, a student 
with a PHEAA grant must have earned 12 semester hours dur- 
ing the summer grading period; this requires a full six semester 
hour load in each of the two six-weeks terms of the grading per- 
iod. 

Limited financial assistance is available through the Blooms- 
burg State College Alumni Association Loan Program and the 



Bloomsburg State College Scholarships. 

Interest-free emergency student loans of $25 or less for a 
maximum of 30 days are available. Application is made at the 
Community Activities Office. 

Students who wish to take advantage of financial assistance 
must file a Financial Aid Form with the College through the 
College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540. High school counsellors can help students find informa- 
tion concerning this statement. 

Further information concerning financial aid opportunities 
may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid at Blooms- 
burg State College. 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 44 



Student Housing 
General Rules 
Revised 



The College reserves the right to assign rooms and room- 
mates in residence halls. Students' housing preferences are con- 
sidered whenever possible. 

Housing and food services are provided only on a com- 
bined basis for students living in residence halls. Housing and 
food service contracts are binding until the end of the academic 
year and may not be transferred or assigned. 

Freshmen men and women are required to reside on cam- 
pus or commute from home unless extenuating circumstances 
justify other housing arrangements. Freshmen wishing to re- 
quest a waiver of the residency or commuting requirements 
must contact the Director of Housing for special permission. 

Although transfer students may indicate housing prefer- 
ences, on-campus housing is not guaranteed. Transfers who wish 

7 



Page 45 



Residence Halls 



to live in the campus residence halls or pursue off-campus hous- 
ing opportunities should contact the Director of Housing upon 
acceptance. 

Upperclass resident students may live on campus as long as 
they satisfy the residence hall eligibility requirements. At pre- 
sent, any resident student who has earned 59 credit hours or 
less at the completion of any fall semester is eligible to partici- 
pate in the room lottery for the following academic year. For 
all practical purposes, this policy excludes students from living 
on campus during their senior year. This eligibility requirement 
is subject to revision to keep pace with ever-changing student 
and institutional needs. 

The residence halls are described in section 1.5, Buildings. 



Details about residence hall rules and regulations are print- 
ed in the Pilot, residence hall manuals, the Terms and Conditions 
of Occupancy, and other housing literature. 



Page 45 



Off-Campus 
Housing 
Completely 
Revised 



All off-campus residences fall within the category of "inde- 
pendent" student housing. This designation means that the Col- 
lege does not approve or recommend residences off campus. 
Student off-campus housing is subject to inspection by officials 
of the town of Bloomsburg and residences with four or more 
students must also meet the standards of the Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Labor and Industry. 

The college Housing Office serves as a referral agency, col- 
lecting data on off-campus housing opportunities, preparing 
housing directories, and providing other useful information to 
student/faculty tenants and their landlords. Before any rental 
property is accepted for publication in the college off-campus 



housing directory, the owner must submit his/her premises to 
an annual inspection by the town building code inspector and 
must sign a statement pledging not to practice illegal discrimin- 
ation in the rental of the property. 

As the Housing Office does not assign students to off- 
campus residences, the student must rely on his/her own initia- 
tive in finding suitable off-campus accommodations. Any off- 
campus negotiations are the sole responsibility of the student 
and the landlord. However, should any difficulties arise in off- 
campus housing or with a landlord, the Director of Housing will 
gladly advise students on methods of resolving such problems. 
In some cases, the Director of Housing will mediate student- 
landlord disputes if such involvement is deemed appropriate, 
but only on an informal, nonlegal basis. 

Students planning to live off campus should have a clear 
understanding of their rights and responsibilities as tenants. To 
help students become more knowledgeable tenants, the Housing 
Office prepares information on topics of interest to off campus 
renters. Brochures and pamphlets are available on such subjects 
as security deposits, leases, discrimination, food stamps, nutri- 
tion, fire safety in the home, model rental contracts, home re- 
pairs and energy conservation. Street maps of the town of 
Bloomsburg, pre-occupancy checklists, office copies of the local 
housing code and Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Indus- 
try regulations, and articles on reading and understanding leases 
are also available to interested students. Upon request, the Di- 
rector of Housing will help student renters conduct pre and 
post-occupancy inventories of their apartments/rooms or serve 
as an impartial observer for alleged violations of the building 
code or other ordinances. 

Off-campus students are advised to obtain insurance pro- 

9 



Page 46 & 47 



Student 
Organizations 
and Activities 
Revised 



tection for their belongings, since most landlords do not assume 
liability for loss of, or damage to, the personal property of their 
tenants. 

Students residing off campus bear a dual responsibility as 
citizens of the town of Bloomsburg and as members of the col- 
lege community. The college cannot provide sanctuary from the 
law nor can it be indifferent to its reputation in the community 
it serves. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Students are encouraged to take part in at least one extra- 
curricular activity per semester. The approved student organiza- 
tions are: 



10 



Amateur Radio Club 
American Chemical Society 
The American Society for 

Personnel Administration 
Association for Childhood 

Education International 

* Association of Resident Men 

* Association of Women Students 
Biology Club 

Bloomsburg Players 

BSC Student Art Association 

Cheerleaders 

Chess Club 

Circuolo Italians Club 

College Community Orchestra 

Circle K 



Inter- Varsity Christian 

Fellowship 
International Relations Club 
Junior Class 
Karate Club 
Le Cercle Francais 
Luzerne Hall 
Madrigal Singers 
Campus Voice 
Maroon and Gold Band 
Mathematics Club 
Montour Residence Hall 
Music Educators National 

Conference 
Newman Student Association 
Obiter 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



College Union Program Board 

* College Union Governing Board 

* Community Government 

Association 

* Commuters Association 

* Commonwealth Association 

of Students 
Concert Choir 

DESCRIPTION 



Off-Campus Students 

Association 
Olympian 

Orthodox Christian Fellowship 
Outing Club 
Phi Beta Lambda 
Philosophy Club 
Physics Club 



Council for Exceptional 

Children 
Earth Science Club 
Economics Club 
Fellowship of Christian 

Athletes 
Fiddlers Green 
Forensic Society 
* Freshman Class 
German Club 
Horticultural Club 
Humanities Club 
Husky Singers 



Psychology Association 
Radio Station 
Russian Club 
Sailing Club 

* Senior Class 
Ski Club 

* Sophomore Class 
Sociology Club 
Spanish Club 

Student Speech & Hearing 

Association 
Student PSEA 
Studio Band 



* These organizations serve large constituencies. 



Page 46 & 47 



Students International Mediation Society 
Student Nursing Association 
Table Tennis Club 



11 



Third World Culture Society 

Veterans Association 

The Way, Campus Outreach 

Weightlifting Club 

Women's Choral Ensemble 

Women's Recreation Association 

Young Democrats 

Young Republicans 

Youth C.A.R.C. 



Page 48 



Professional and 
Honorary Societies 
Fraternities and 
Sororities 
Revised 



Alpha Phi Gamma 
Alpha Psi Omega 
Delta Mu Delta 
Delta Phi Alpha 
Gamma Theta Upsilon 
Kappa Delta Pi 
Kappa Kappa Psi 
Kappa Mu Epsilon 
Omicron Delta Epsilon 



Phi Kappa Phi 
Phi Sigma Pi 
Phi Alpha Theta 
Pi Kappa Delta 
Pi Omega Pi 
Psi Chi 

Sigma Tau Delta 
Tau Beta Sigma 



Page 48 



12 



Social Fraternities 
and Sororities 
Revised 



The Inter- Fraternity Council (IFC) serves as the governing 
body of the nine social fraternities, and coordinates rushing, 
pledging, and programming. The fraternities, with dates of or- 
ganization, are: 



Beta Sigma Delta 


1966 


Delta Omega Chi 


1965 


Delta Pi 


1967 


Kappa Alpha Psi 


Probationary 


Lambda Chi Alpha 


1967 


Phi Sigma Xi 


1966 



national September 1970 



Sigma Iota Omega 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Zeta Psi 



1964 

Probationary 

1966 



national September 1969 



Page 49 



Service Fraternities 
and Sororities 
Revision 



Page 50 



Student Insurance 
Change 



The Inter-Sorority Council (ISC) is composed of represen- 
tatives of the seven social sororities. The Council coordinates 
the rushing and pledging activities and endeavors to enhance 
friendship and social relations between sororities and individual 
women. The group consists of: 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Chi Sigma Rho 
Delta Epsilon Beta 
Phi Iota Chi 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Tau Sigma Pi 
Theta Tau Omega 



Probationary 

1967 

1966 

1974 

1967 

1967 

1968 



national November 1971 



These organizations are dedicated to providing service to 
the campus and community at large. Alpha Phi Omega (1963) 
is open to any second semester freshman male with a 2.0 or 
higher average. Lambda Alpha Mu (1964) is open to any second 
semester freshman woman with a 2.0 or higher cumulative av- 
erage. 

A health insurance plan for undergraduate and graduate 
students who wish to participate on a voluntary basis is being 
negotiated. Further information will be provided and a brochure 
concerning the plan will be available at the Health Center in the 
Kehr Union Building. 

13 



Page 51 



Page 51 



Page 53 



Page 53 



Banking 
Addition 



College Store 
Hours changed 



Veteran's Office 
Revision 



Career Development 
Addition 



A full service branch of the Bloomsburg Bank-Columbia 
Trust Co. is located on the ground floor of the Kehr Union 
Building. The services available to faculty, staff, and students 
include conventional checking and savings accounts, money or- 
ders and Treasurer's checks, Christmas clubs, Vacation clubs, 
Traveler's checks, repayment of loans and handling P.P.&L. and 
Pa. Gas & Water Co. bills. 

The hours are as follows: Monday and Tuesday: 10:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; Wednesday: 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.; Thursday: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; 
and Friday: 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed weekends. 

The College Store sells books and supplies needed during 
the year; it is open from 8:00 a.m. to 7:55 p.m. on Monday, 
8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday through Friday and from 
8:30 a.m. until noon on Saturday. 

An office for veterans is maintained in Benjamin Franklin 
Building by veterans who are full time students to assist vet- 
erans with personal problems, especially those related to hous- 
ing, employment, health, recreation, vocational and technical 
training and financial assistance, and to provide liaison with 
other administrative offices. The Office of Veteran's Affairs is 
under the direction of The School of Extended Programs. Re- 
quired reports to the Veteran's Administration are sent from 
the Registrar's Office. 

There is a Career Development Course offered by the Edu- 
cation Services Department. The Center works closely with the 
department to assist those who are seeking an understanding of 
career choice process. 



14 



Page 54 



Quest 



Page 59 



Page 59 & 60 



4.13 



4.13 



A program of outdoor pursuits in education has been de- 
veloped under the title QUEST. Its activities aim to encourage 
characteristics such as responsibility, leadership, self-confidence, 
trust, loyalty, initiative, self-discipline, and sensitivity through 
personal experiences in field trips, field study, and certain types 
of experiential education away from campus. Certain of the 
experiences may be designed to permit cooperating departments 
to offer academic credit to students who participate. Participa- 
tion is not confined to college students, but may include faculty 
and other individuals from a wide range of ages. 

The actual activities offered to accomplish the QUEST ob- 
jectives are: rock climbing, backpacking, canoeing, sky diving, 
hang gliding, rafting, bicycling, cross country skiing, along with 
exposures to new cultures within our society. Equipment for 
most of the activities is available at no cost to the participants. 
There is also a special five-day outdoor experience offered to all 
incoming freshmen students in conjunction with their summer 
orientation program which is called "Up Reach." 

Change title from International Students to International Edu- 
cation 

Students may participate in a variety of study abroad pro- 
grams during their enrollment at Bloomsburg State College. Each 
summer the college offers courses for credit in foreign coun- 
tries, such as France, England, Spain, Ireland, and the Soviet 
Union. As a member of the Pennsylvania Consortium for Inter- 
national Education, Bloomsburg also offers summer courses in 
Salzburg, Austria and Mexico, in cooperation with the other 13 
state colleges and university. Through the Pennsylvania Consor- 
tium for International Education, the college also makes arrange- 

15 



merits for Junior Year Abroad programs or Semester Abroad 
programs. Information about these programs may be obtained 
in the Office of International Education. 

Page 59 & 60 4.13 Students in teacher education programs may be assigned to 

do their student teaching in one of the centers abroad with 
which Bloomsburg cooperates: in Quito, Ecuador; Recife, 
Brazil; or Liverpool, England. Further information about this 
program may be obtained in the Office of International Educa- 
tion. 

Page 74 & 75 General Education GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Policy Revised 

(Revised and Effective) 
9/15/76 

The primary objective of General Education is to encour- 
age in students, irrespective of their vocational pursuits, the de- 
velopment of those understandings, attitudes, values, and social 
skills that will enable them to enjoy a fuller life and to play a 
more constructive role in society. 

The pattern of general education outlined above reflects a 
belief that a college must attempt to insure that the standards 
of an educated person in reading and writing have been attained, 
and should require the student to have experiences in the three 
recognized broad areas of knowledge: the humanities for their 
insights concerning intellectual and ethical values, the social sci- 
ences for enlightenment basic to understanding problems of so- 
ciety, and the sciences and mathematics for mature appreciation 
16 



of the contribution of these branches of knowledge in determin- 
ing the nature of an industrial-technical society. 

Prescription of general education courses has been set at a 
minimum in order to give each student, with the help of an ad- 
visor, the opportunity to survey his previous background and 
choose new intellectual experiences that provide opportunity 
for optimum growth. This policy places important responsibil- 
ity upon the student for discrimination in making decisions. 

General Education courses should be those which contri- 
bute to the broadening and rounding of our students' education 
in line with the stated philosophy of General Education. 

Each college department will re-list General Education 
courses subject to appropriate review. 

(General Education courses should not be those which 
were designed primarily for majors in a discipline or by methods 
and material courses.) 

I. Required Courses: 

English Composition 101 and 102 3-6 S.H. 

or 
English Composition 104 

Physical Education (Activity courses only with 4 S.H. 

a minimal competency in swimming.) 

II. Special Electives 

This requirement is fulfilled by taking an indicated number 
of semester hours from each of the three groups, with at 
least two of the disciplines of each group represented. The 

17 



student's major discipline may not be included in the gen- 
eral education requirement. Students with double majors 
must adhere to this policy for only one of the disciplines. 

Group A Group B Group C 

Humanities and Social/Behavioral Natural Sciences 
the Arts Sciences and Mathematics 



Art 

English 

Foreign 
Languages 

History 

Music 

Philosophy 

Speech 

Communication 
and Theatre Arts 

15 S.H. 

III. Additional Electives 



Economics 

Geography 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Anthropology 



Biology 
Chemistry 
Mathematics 
Physics 
Earth Sciences 



12 S.H. 



12 S.H. 



18 



Nine-twelve (9-12) semester hours of general education e- 
lectives may be selected from any of the disciplines listed 
under Special Electives and/or from business, education, 
and health and physical education (excluding activities 
courses). 

Total Hours 58 

Note — All general education courses must be chosen from 
the general education courses list provided by the Office of 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Only those courses 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 
Page 80 



Page 81 
Page 81 



REVISION 
New Course 



05.246 
Delete 

New Course 



listed can be used to complete the General Education Re- 
quirement. 

DESCRIPTION 

05.110 Varsity Golf (Approved 2/24/77) 1 Credit Hour 

An opportunity for the more skilled individual to partici- 
pate on the inter-collegiate level, and enhance the overall 
development of the person via the experiences encounter- 
ed sociologically and psychologically. 

05.246 Delete — Beginning Scuba Diving (Approved 4/22/77) 



05.247 Rock Climbing (Approved 5/2/77) 1 Semester Hour 

For the beginning rock climbing enthusiast with basic 
knowledge, skills, and practical application of it in actual 
rock climbing experiences. This will serve as a foundation 
for further experiences in this area of recreation. 



Page 81 



New Course 



05.249 Synchronized Swimming 

mester Hour 



(Approved 5/2/77) 1 Se- 



Page 82 



05.270 



Designed to give students a basic background in the fun- 
damental skills, strokes and movement progressions in- 
volved in developing a basic routine. 

Change contact hours for 05.270 Exercise and You to 3 con- 
tact hours. (Approved 11/29/76) 

19 



Page 82 



New Course 



Page 82 



Page 82 



Page 82 



Page 82 



Page 83 



New Course 



New Course 



New Course 



New Course 



05.332 
Delete 



05.271 Intermediate Archery (Approved 7/12/76) 1 Semes- 
ter Hour 

To provide the opportunity for the student to develop 
shooting skills to the best of his own ability. 

05.272 Intermediate Bowling (Approved 7/12/76) 1 Semes- 
ter Hour 

This course is intended to develop advanced skill and 
knowledge of bowling. 

05.273 Intermediate Golf (Approved 7/12/76) 1 Semester 
Hour 

Instruction in the techniques and strategy involved in im- 
proving the individual skills of the student. 

05.274 Intermediate Tennis (Approved 7/12/76) 1 Semester 
Hour 

To improve the tennis skills of each individual. 

05.275 Power Volleyball (Approved 7/12/76) 1 Semester 
Hour 

This intermediate level course is mostly participation and 
will include the development and history of volleyball 
along with the improvement of fundamental skills, team 
play, and strategy. 

05.332 Delete — Foundations of Leisure and Recreation (Ap- 
proved 4/22/77) 



20 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 83 
Page 87 



05.334 
Delete 

New Course 



05.334 Delete — Recreation Program and Staff Development 

(Approved 4/22/77) 

10.205 Commercial French (Approved 11/29/76) 3 Semes- 
ter Hours 

A one semester course to introduce students to French 
business language, terminology, and economic life. Prereq- 
uisite: French 10.104 or equivalent. 



Page 93 



New Course 



12.203 Commercial Spanish 

ter Hours 



(Approved 5/17/77) 3 Semes- 



Page 96 



New Course 



For students enrolled in business administration. The 
course is designed to acquaint students with the basic skills 
in Spanish trade correspondence and commercial reading. 
Special emphasis is placed on the writing of business let- 
ters, vocabulary, and commercial idioms. An elementary 
knowledge of commercial life and methods is also stressed. 

14.103 Intermediate Italian I 

14.104 Intermediate Italian II (Approved 11/19/76) 3 Se- 
mester Hours 

For students who have successfully completed Italian 102 
or who have equivalent high school background. A review 
of basic grammar is presented accompanied by a deeper in- 
vestigation into the grammatical principles. A balanced pro- 
gram is presented for the development of the four language 
skills: speaking, oral comprehension, reading, and writing. 

21 



A supplementary reading text is incorporated into the 
course; and weekly language lab sessions are obligatory. 
Italian I Prerequisite: 14.102 or equivalent 
Italian II Prerequisite: 14.103 or equivalent 

Page 102 20.411 20.411 Title Change from Generative Transformational Gram- 

Title Change mar to Modern Linguistic Theory (Approved 3/11/77) 

Page 103 New Course 25.104 Interpersonal Speech/Communication (Approved 4/ 

30/76) 3 Semester Hours 

An analysis of rhetorical situations that emphasize an in- 
timate setting for developing interpersonal speech/com- 
munication. 

Page 109 New Course 30.303 Crafts for Special Education (Approved 6/8/76) 3 

Semester Hours 

Laboratory experiences with crafts activities applicable for 
all levels of the exceptional child with emphasis and cor- 
relation for the total special education program. 

Page 111 32.275 Insert a daggar after 32.275 Crafts. 

Page 114 New Course 32.396 Independent Study in Art Media II (Approved 

7/12/76) 1-6 Semester Hours 

Individualized production in the plastic arts not covered 
by the other studio course offerings and in-depth explo- 
rations, innovative uses and applications of selected art 
media. Course may be repeated more than once with the 
instructors consent. 

22 



Page 125 New Course 41.497 Internship in Urban/Regional Planning (Approved 

7/12/76) 12 Semester Hours 

It involves the placement of a student who is enrolled in 
the course of study in Urban/Regional Planning into a 
planning office for one semester, during which time the 
student will be actively involved in the functions and activ- 
ities of that planning office. 

Page 125 New Course 41.498 Urban/Regional Design (Approved 11/29/76) 3 Se- 

mester Hours 

To be taken in coordination with the internship in Urban/ 
Regional Planning. The course provides an opportunity for 
reporting and analyzing experiences in internship. It also 
integrates and utilizes practice in the development of land 
use plans for urban /regional development. 

Page 126 New Course 42.100 Trans-Atlantic World in the 20th Century (Approved 

12/12/76) 3 Semester Hours 

The course utilizes both thematic and interdisciplinary ap- 
proaches to the examination of the trans- Atlantic World. 
The Americas and the countries of Western Europe are in- 
tegrated through discussions which take into consideration 
the social, political, economic and intellectual develop- 
ments of these areas of the western world. Paramount em- 
phasis is placed on the inter-connectedness of the twen- 
tieth century experiences of these nations. 



23 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 118 



Page 118 



Page 119 
Page 125 



Page 125 



New Course 



New Course 



Chairperson 
New Course 



New Course 



35.351 Piano Teachers Seminar 

mester Hours 



(Approved 2/11/77) 3 Se- 



Course designed for experienced pianists. 

35.352 Seminar in Vocal Literature and Techniques (Ap- 
proved 2/11/77) 3 Semester Hours 

A course that enables experienced vocalists to examine the 
physical mechanism of the singing voices, the classical vo- 
cal literature, and the application of physiology and psy- 
chology in the study of singing. 

Woo Bong Lee, Chairperson, Economics Department 

41.350 Advanced Planning (Approved 7/21/76) 3 Semester 
Hours 

This course is considered an integral part of the Urban and 
Regional Planning concentration offered by the Depart- 
ment of Geography and Earth Science. This course will 
deal principally with the processes of analysis and imple- 
mentation of planning programs, incorporating skills and 
techniques that are utilized in these processes. 

41.370 Rural Settlement and Land Use (Approved 10/30/76) 
3 Semester Hours 

Investigate the major patterns of rural settlement and land 
use and the process involved in explaining the changing 
American rural landscape. 



24 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 127 



New Course 



42.281 Military History 

Hours 



I (Approved 3/28/77) 3 credit 



Page 127 



New Course 



Page 128 



New Course 



Page 132 



New Course 



A study of organized warfare from its origins to the last 
campaign of Napoleon I. While concentrating on strategy 
and tactics, the course also will examine moral and social 
problems raised by warfare. 

42.282 Military History II (Approved 3/28/77) 3 credit 
Hours 

A study of organized warfare and the theory of war from 
the Napoleonic age to the present. Concentrating on strat- 
egy and tactics, this course still examines the socio-politi- 
cal background, especially of the two world wars and the 
age of the guerilla. 

42.354 The Rise of Modern China to Mao Tse-Tung (Ap- 
proved 1/20/76) 3 Semester Hours 

A history of China from the coming of the West to the pre- 
sent. The main thread of the course is an analysis of 
China's strategy for survival under the impact of foreign 
ideologies and economics. Special attention will be paid to 
the rise to power of Mao Tse-Tung and his policies. 

44.110 Learning Politics through Science Fiction (Approved 
3/28/77) 3 credits 

Using science fiction novels, films and short stories to 
teach an introductory course dealing with continuing po- 
litical concepts and problems in the discipline. „ 5 



Page 132 New Course 44.171 Comparing States and Nations (Approved 1/24/77) 

An introduction to the procedures of comparative govern- 
ment with emphasis on research methodologies and inter- 
pretation of research results. This course will be world- 
wide rather than regional in scope. 

Page 133 New Course 44.323 Politics and Psychology (Approved 8/13/76) 3 Se- 

mester Hours 

This course seeks to describe, explain and analyze topics 
in personality and social psychology that seem relevant in 
understanding political behavior. It seeks to explore the 
question: "What are the relationships between a man's 
personality, his psychological make-up and the way he be- 
haves politically?" Moreover, it will try to show students 
how to think about psychology and politics, what kinds of 
evidence to gather and how to gather that evidence in a 
scientific way. 

Page 133 44.356 44.356 Delete — Environment and Politics 

Delete (Approved 2/11/77) 

Page 133 44.368 44.368 Delete - Political Systems-Latin America 

Delete (Approved 4/22/77) 

Page 134 New Course 44.372 Government and Politics of the Middle East (Ap- 

proved 10/27/76) 3 Semester Hours 

This is a three credit course that seeks to present and ana- 
lyze the politics of the Middle East as a coherent system 
for regional politics of particular states within the Middle 
East. The course also will focus on the conflict between 
Arabs and Israelis and the international complications of 
26 that conflict. 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 

Page 134 



Page 134 
Page 134 



Page 135 



REVISION 

New Course 



44.418 
Delete 

44.429 
Title and 
Description 
Change 



44.446 
New Course 



DESCRIPTION 

44.412 Scope, Approaches and Methods of Political Science 

(Approved 10/25/76) 3 Semester Hours 

This course seeks to explain and analyze the various ap- 
proaches and methods currently in use in political science 
as well as to indicate the range and develop the logic of 
that discipline. Specifically it studies: the scope and na- 
ture of political science; the meaning and nature of facts, 
concepts and constructive "laws", explanation, and theory, 
the problem of values in political science; various ap- 
proaches such as functionalism, systems' theory, power 
theories, groups and roles, etc., and methods of research. 

44.418 Delete — Computer Applications in Political Science 
(Approved 2/11/77) 

Title Change: 44.429 From Black Politics to Racism and Sex- 
ism in American Politics (Approved 3/28/77) 

A study of the role of blacks and women in American poli- 
tics. The course will trace briefly the historical background 
leading to their position today. It will relate these pro- 
blems to each of the three branches of government, polit- 
ical parties, and pressure groups. 

Change title of 44.446 Constitutional Law to Constitutional 
Law I (Approved 10/19/76) 3 Semester Hours 

An analysis of the evolution, structure, and function of the 
Supreme Court concentrating on governmental relation- 
ships including: powers of the judicial, legislative, and 

27 



executive branches; the division of powers between the 
national government and the states; taxing, commerce, and 
war powers. (No prerequisites) 

Page 135 New Course AAA^l Constitutional Law II (Approved 10/19/76) 3 Se- 

mester Hours 

A study of the decisions of the Supreme Court as they re- 
lated to the individual and the government concentrating 
on: nationalization of the Bill of Rights; rights of persons 
accused of crimes; equal protection and voting rights. (No 
prerequisites) 

Page 135 New Course 44.456 Public Policy (Approved 2/11/77) 3 Semester Hours 

It will cover all aspects of public policy including those re- 
lated to the environment. It will include formation and 
adoption, implementation, impact and outcome, and eval- 
ualtion and analysis. 

Page 135 New Course 44.457 Political Economy (Approved 2/11/77) 3 Semester 

Hours 

A course designed primarily for political science majors 
dealing with political markets, currency and resource flow, 
exchange, bargaining, inflation and deflation, and resource 
accumulation. 

Page 136 Chairperson James H. Huber, Chairperson, Sociology Department 

Page 140 New Course 45.490 Sociology of Aging (Approved 6/8/76) 3 Semester 

Hours 

28 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 141 
Page 141 



Page 142 

Page 143 
Page 144 

Page 145 



46.340 
Title Change 

New Course 



46.490 
Title Change 

Chairperson 

48.351 
Number Change 

48.376 
Title Change 



This course serves as general introduction to the field of 
aging. Gerontology is a field of study and practice which 
concerns itself with the process of aging and their conse- 
quences. The aged in America constitute a segment of the 
population now demanding more attention than ever in 
their sociological environment. 

46.340 Title Change from Prehistory and Ethnography of 
North America to North American Indians 

46.405 Primates (Approved 5/24/76) 3 Semester Hours 

The study of the various phenomena affecting primate be- 
havior: ecology, social life, and socio-cultural adaption, 
with emphasis on the development of socio-biological traits 
relating to human origins. Prerequisite: 46.100 and 50.210 

46.490 Title Change from Socialization of the Child in Primi- 
tive Society to Socialization of the Child (Approved 
11/29/76) 

John S. Baird, Chairperson, Psychology Department 

Number change from 48.351 to 48.251 Social Psychology 
(Approved 4/13/77) 

48.376 Title Change from Principles of Applied Learning to 
Principles of Behavior Modification (Approved 10/ 
30/76) 



29 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Infor- 
mation Science (CIS) is offered jointly by the Department of 
Mathematics and the School of Business. Hence the resources 
of the college are combined to provide for students wishing a 
computer major. 

Degree: 

The degree, Bachelor of Science in Computer and Infor- 
mation Science (CIS) will be conferred upon successful com- 
pletion of the Computer and Information Science curriculum. 

Objectives: 

The first objective of the program is to provide a broad 
educational base for intelligent citizenship. The core courses re- 
quired will likewise provide a breadth of knowledge in the com- 
puter and information processing field. More specifically each 
student majoring in the program will be able to select courses, 
with the guidance of an advisor, which will accomplish one or 
more of the following purposes: 

(a) Prepare the graduate for positions in the computer 
industry. 

(b) Provide specific, marketable skills in business and sci- 
entific computing applications. 

(c) Prepare the graduate for further study in graduate 
programs in computer-related fields. 



30 



Page 147 



Page 147 

Page 149 

Page 151 
Page 154 



Page 154 
Page 155 

Page 157 



Arts and 
Sciences major 
for the B.A. 
Degree in 
Biology 

New Course 



Course 
50.352 

50.372 
Hours Change 

New Course 



Chairperson 

52.108 
Hours Change 

Mathematics 
New Degree 
Program 



Language requirement — 6 to 8 semester hours in one of the 
following languages or thereupon passing a proficiency exami- 
nation: German, French, Russian or Spanish. 



50.107 Medical Terminology (Approved 1/24/77) 1 credit 
1 clock hour 

Medical Terminology is vital to students in the health sci- 
ences and medical technology. 
50.352 Field Zoology Prerequisite: 50.210 or consentofthe 
instructor. This course does count toward a Biology 
Major. 
50.372 Plant Physiology (Approved 10/30/76) Change in 
hours from 5 to 3 

51.370 Hydrology (Approved 7/12/76) 3 Semester Hours 

A course designed to introduce students to the principles 
and techniques of hydrology. The course will stress the 
practical aspects of hydrology and include appreciable 
amounts of time in the field. 

Roy D. Pointer, Chairperson, Chemistry Department 

52.108 Physiological Chemistry — Change in clock hours 
from 3 to 4 

Arts and Sciences major for B.S. Degree in Computer and Infor- 
mation Science 

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 

General Information: 

31 



In addition to opportunities for CIS majors, the program 
provides introductory courses for the general education of all 
students; specialized courses concerned with particular appli- 
cation of the computer to specific disciplines are also available. 

Curriculum Requirements: 

The curriculum in Computer and Information Science re- 
quires the successful completion of six sets of courses: 

A. General Education (See Section 6.3) 

B. Required Core Courses: 92.250, 252, 256, 350, 452; 
93.271. 

C. Required Supporting Core Courses: 25.103; either 
53.125 and 53.126; or 53.118 and 123; 91.221; 40. 
221; and either 53.241 or 53.141. 

D. Restricted Electives: Fifteen semester hours chosen 
from the following: 92.254, 352, 354, 356, 358, 456; 
53.371, 373, 381, 471, 472, 492; 90.431. 

E. Restricted Related Electives: Fifteen semester hours 
chosen from the following: 53.212, 225, 226, 322, 
341, 421, 422; 90.331; 91.222, 323; 93.344, 345, 
445; 40.212. 

F. Free Electives as required to meet the total 128 sem. 
hr. graduation requirement. 

Page 159 53.202 Title Change from 53.202 Algebraic and Geometric Structures 

Title Change to Geometry for Elementary Teachers (Approved 

10/1/76) 

32 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 

Page 159 
Page 160 



Page 161 



Page 163 



REVISION 



53.212 

Number Change 

53.281 

Title, Number 
and Description 
Change 



New Course 



New Course 



DESCRIPTION 



Number change from 53.212 Linear Algebra to 53.315 Linear 
Algebra to reflect the prerequisite 53.225 (Approved 
10/1/76) 

Change title, number, and description of 53.281 Mathematical 
Models with Application to 53.381 Introduction to 
Operations Research. (Approved 10/21/76) 

A survey of the methods and models used in applying 
mathematics to problems of Business. Topics to be drawn 
from decision making, linear and dynamic programming, 
networks, inventory models, Markov processes, and queu- 
ing theory. 

53.373 Numerical Methods in Computing (Approved 10/1/ 
76) 3 Semester Hours 

Study of various algorithms for the solution of nonlinear 
equations; the solution of simultaneous equations; inter- 
polation of data; numerical integration; graph theory; and 
linear programming. The student will execute most of the 
algorithms using the computer. 

Prerequisites: 53.171 or 53.172, 53.118 and 53.123 or 
53.126 or 53.225. 

54.105 Energy: Sources and Environmental Effects (Ap- 
proved 9/13/76) 3 Semester Hours 

The course is a primer in the problems of energy sources 

33 



Page 163 



Page 164 



54.107 
Title Change 



New Course 



Page 170 



Student 
Teaching 
Cen ters 
Addendum 



utilization, and environmental effects in a technological 
society. It will include a review of circumstances leading to 
the present crises, a survey of the major sources of energy 
(petroleum, coal, nuclear fuels) including reserves, utiliza- 
tion in industry, transportation, production of electricity 
and their effects on the environment. Supplemental sources 
such as hydroelectric, wind, solar, geothermal and others 
will also be reviewed in terms of their technological state 
and promise for the future. 

54.107 Title Change from Applied Physics for Medical Tech- 
nologists to Applied Physics for Health Services (Ap- 
proved 11/9/76) 

54.400 Advanced Physics Laboratory (Approved 11/29/76) 
4 Contact Hours, 2 Semester Hours 

The course will deal with the basic tenets of lab work in 
physics, involving considerations of experimental error, 
proper research and preparation for an experiment, and 
experimental design. Experiments primarily from the areas 
of atomic physics, electricity and magnetism, and optics 
will be performed. 
(Replaces lab portions of 54.310, 54.314 and 54.318) 

It may be possible for students in teacher education programs 
to be assigned to do their student teaching in one of the centers 
abroad with which Bloomsburg cooperates: Quito, Ecuador; 
Recife, Brazil; or Liverpool, England. Further information a- 
bout this program may be obtained in the Office of Internation- 
al Education. 



34 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 

Page 170 
Page 171 



REVISION 



Curriculum 
Coordinator 

C. Professional 
Education and 
Elementary 
Specialization 
Revised list of 
courses for 
Education and 
Electives 



DESCRIPTION 



William O'Bruba, Elementary and Early Childhood Curriculum 
Coordinator 

EDUCATION 

(required) 

60.393 Social Foundations of Education or 60.341 Education 
in an Urban Society 

35.311 Music in the Elementary School 

05.311 Methods and Materials in Physical Education 

48.321 Psychological Tests and Measures or 60.311 Educa- 
tional Measurements 

62.371 Teaching of Reading 

62.373 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading or 62.375 Reading 
for the Socially Disadvantaged Child 

62.302 Methods and Materials in Elementary School Science 

62.398 Methods and Materials in Elementary Mathematics 

62.395 Curriculum and Instruction 

62.301 Education Media 

62.401 Student Teaching in Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education 

62.411 Professional Seminar: Elementary and Early Child- 
hood Education 

ELECTIVE 
(Nine semester hours must be elected from the following courses) 



35 



Page 172 



C. Professional 
Education and 
Early Childhood 
Education 
Specialization 
Revised list of 
courses for 
Education and 
Electives 



62.304 Practical Procedures and Practices in Environmental 

Education for the Elementary School Teacher 

62.310 Fine Arts in Elementary Education 

62.321 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 

62.322 Seminar in Learning Experiences with Young Children 
62.376 Language Experiences for Children 

62.389 Individualizing Instruction Activities in the Elemen- 
tary School 

62.480 A Study of Discipline in the Elementary School 

20.351 Literature for Children 

25.318 Creative Dramatics 

25.319 Children's Theatre 

05.320 Health and Safety in the Elementary School 

N-K-3 (Early Childhood Certification) 
EDUCATION (Required) 

60.393 Social Foundations of Education or 60.341 Educa- 
tion in an Urban Society 
60.301 Education Media 
62.303 Methods and Materials in Elementary Science N,K-3 

62.321 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 

62.322 Seminar in Learning Experiences with Young Child- 
ren 

62.371 Teaching of Reading (Early Childhood Section) 
62.373 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading (Early Childhood 

Section) 
62.433 Communicative Arts in Early Childhood 
62.432 Social Studies in the Elementary School 
62.396 Mathematics for the Young Child 



36 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



62.401 Student Teaching in Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education 

62.411 Professional Seminar: Elementary and Early Child- 
hood Education 

ELECTIVES 
(15 semester hours must be elected from the following courses:) 

20.351 Literature for Children 

25.318 Creative Dramatics 

26.319 Children's Theatre 
32.275 General Crafts 
35.242 Class Piano I 

35.311 Music in the Elementary School 

48.321 Psychological Tests and Measures or 60.311 Educa- 
tional Measurements 
45.336 Child Welfare 

62.375 Reading for the Socially Disadvantaged Child 

62.376 Language Experiences for Children 

62.389 Individualizing Instruction Activities in the Elemen- 
tary School 
70.201 Education of Exceptional Children 

62.310 Fine Arts in Elementary Education 

62.480 A Study of Discipline in the Elementary School 

05.311 Methods and Materials in Elementary Physical Edu- 
cation 

30.305 Children's Art 

37 



Page 176 



Page 176 & 177 



Page 189 
Page 190 



Page 190 



Core Courses 

History 

Addendum 

History 

Curriculum 

Change 



Chairperson 
New Course 



New Course 



Add - or 42.223 



Delete History Board Approach and Concentrated Approach 
and add History (Approved 5/11/77) 

21 credit hours in history with at least 18 credit hours in 
300 or 400 level courses. Included in the 21 credit hours 
are History 42.398, a minimum of one course from each of 
the following groups: Non-western World, Europe, and 
United States, and 9 credit hours of history electives. 
In addition, from free electives at least 6 credit hours in 
social science courses apart from history. 

William O'Bruba, Chairperson, Elementary Education 

62.310 The Fine Arts in Elementary Education (Approved 
1/26/77) 3 Semester Hours 

Designed to provide competencies in the selection and im- 
plementation of materials and procedures for teaching the 
literary, visual, and performing arts to elementary school 
children. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension and in- 
tegration of the fine arts into all areas of the school curric- 
ulum. 

62.304 Practical Procedures and Practices in Environmental 
Education for the Elementary School Teacher (Ap- 
proved 4/21/76) 3 Semester Hours 



38 



CATALOGUE REVISION DESCRIPTION 

PAGE 

An introduction to learning experiences in environmental 
education appropriate for the elementary school level. 
Ways to incorporate the topic, both as a separate subject 
and integrated with other areas of the curriculum, are in- 
cluded. Camping and a fee are required. 

Page 191 62.396 62.396 Mathematics for the Young Child (Approved 11/17/ 

Prerequisites 76) 3 Semester Hours 

An activities-centered course designed for the teachers of 

children from birth to age 9. 

Prerequisites: 53.201 and 53.202 are recommended 

Page 191 New Course 62.401 Student Teaching in Elementary and Early Childhood 

Education (Approved 2/11/77) 12 Semester Hours 

Scheduled on a full semester basis with a minimum of 30 
hours per week. Opportunities for direct participating ex- 
periences are provided. Students are placed in classrooms 
with carefully selected cooperating teachers. The major(s) 
of the students determine one of the following assignments: 

K-6 One experience in a primary division and 

one experience in an intermediate divi- 
sion of a public school. 

N-K-3 One experience in a preschool situation 

and one in a primary division of a public 
school or two experiences in a primary 
division of a public school. 

39 



K-6 & N-K-3 One experience in a preschool situation 

(Dual Major) or primary division of a public school 

and one experience in an intermediate 

division. 

Page 192 62.411 

New Title 62.411 Title Change from Professional Practicum Seminar in 

Elementary Education to Professional Seminar: Ele- 
mentary and Early Childhood Education (Approved 

2/11/77) 

Page 192 New Course 62.433 Communicative Arts in Early Childhood (Approved 

4/18/77) 3 Semester Hours 

Methods, materials and practices in the language arts for 
prospective teachers who will be certified to teach from 
the nursery years through grade three. 

Page 192 New Course 62.480 Study of Discipline in the Elementary School (Ap- 

proved 1/24/77) 3 Semester Hours 

A course designed specifically for prospective elementary 
teachers of junior level and above which emphasizes tech- 
niques designed to modify behavior in a positive way and 
the changing of wrong associations. This course may also 
be elected by teachers-in-service desiring to update and im- 
prove their skills of classroom control. 

Page 200 New Course 74.205 Prerequisites to Instructional Methods for the Hear- 

ing Impaired (Approved 12/14/76) 3 Semester 
Hours 

40 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 202 

Page 205 

Page 206 
Page 207 

Page 207 



74.467 



82.401 
Change Credits 

Chairperson 

New Major 



Curriculum 
Requirements 
Item C — 
Specialization 
in one of the 
following areas: 
New Degree 
Program 



This course introduced students to the design of instruc- 
tional procedures and methods of implementing curricu- 
lums for education of the hearing impaired. Traditional 
and innovative approaches to teaching are discussed and 
demonstrated. 

74.467 Title Change from Psychology of Speech and Hearing 
to Applied Behavior Analysis in Speech and Language 
Therapy (Approved 12/12/76) 

82.401 Community Health Nursing Change from 1-12 cre- 
dits to 3-12 credits (Approved 10/28/76) 

Normal L. Hilgar, Chairperson, Business Administration 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - MARKETING 



Required: 
93.456. 



93.440, 442, 443, 452, and either 93.341 or 



COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 

General Information: 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Infor- 
mation Science (CIS) is offered jointly by the Department of 
Mathematics and the School of Business. Hence the resources 
of the college are combined to provide for students wishing a 
computer major. 



41 



Degree: 

The degree, Bachelor of Science in Computer and Infor- 
mation Science (CIS) will be conferred upon successful com- 
pletion of the Computer and Information Science curriculum. 

Objectives: 

The first objective of the program is to provide a broad 
educational base for intelligent citizenship. The core courses re- 
quired will likewise provide a breadth of knowledge in the com- 
puter and information processing field. More specifically each 
student majoring in the program will be able to select courses, 
with the guidance of an advisor, which will accomplish one or 
more of the following purposes: 

(a) Prepare the graduate for positions in the computer 
industry. 

(b) Provide specific, marketable skills in business and sci- 
entific computing applications. 

(c) Prepare the graduate for further study in graduate 
programs in computer-related fields. 

In addition to opportunities for CIS majors, the program 
provides introductory courses for the general education of all 
students; specialized courses concerned with particular appli- 
cation of the computer to specific disciplines are also available. 

Curriculum Requirements: 

The curriculum in Computer and Information Science re- 
quires the successful completion of six sets of courses: 



42 



CATALOGUE 
PAGE 



REVISION 



DESCRIPTION 



Page 212 



New Course 



A. General Education (See Section 6.3) 

B. Required Core Courses: 92.250, 252, 256, 350, 452; 
93.271. 

C. Required Supporting Core Courses: 25.103; either 
53.125 and 53.126; or 53.118 and 123; 91.221; 
40.211; and either 53.241 or 53.141. 

D. Restricted Electives: Fifteen semester hours chosen 
from the following: 92.254, 352, 354, 356, 358, 456; 
53.371, 373, 381, 471, 472, 492; 90.431. 

E. Restricted Related Electives: Fifteen semester hours 
chosen from the following: 53.212, 225, 226, 322, 
341, 421, 422; 90.331; 91.222, 323; 93.344, 345, 
445; 40.212. 

F. Free Electives as required to meet the total 128 sem. 
hr. graduation requirement. 

92.256 Data and Information Structures (Approved ) 
3 Semester Hours 

A detailed study of operations and applications with char- 
acter strings, linked lists, graphs and trees emphasizing 
techniques and mechanics rather than theory using a high- 
level list processing language. Includes a study of file struc- 
ture and data base comcepts. 
Prerequisites: 92.252 or 53.271 



43 



Page 212 New Course 92.358 Hardware Architecture and Configuration (Approved 

) 3 Semester Hours 

Includes an examination of the current market in main- 
frames, peripherals, terminals, data entry devices, minicom- 
puters, etc. The student will gain additional practical ex- 
perience in feasibility studies, cost analysis, and contract 
megotiations. 

Page 215 New Course 93.452. Marketing Research (Approved 11/9/76) 3 Semester 

Hours 

Development and application of the skills of the scientific 
marketing research process to the range of decisions and 
issues in marketing. Basic marketing research procedure 
(problem definition, research design, data collection, ana- 
lysis and interpretation) and recent developments in mar- 
keting information systems are brought to apply to pro- 
duct planning, advertising research, consumer and competi- 
tive analysis. 
Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing 

Page 216 New Course 94.303 Typewriting Workshop (Approved 3/11/77) 2-3 

Semester Hours 

A workshop designed to provide for the varying needs of 
students with diverse backgrounds, especially transfer stu- 
dents. Material covered would depend upon individual stu- 
dent's background, prior coursework and needs. 



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